Matsuyama, Pavon and Taylor solidify standing in Olympic Golf Ranking

Over the past month, several players across the men’s and women’s professional golf landscape have made emphatic moves within the top 60 of the Olympic Golf Ranking (OGR). Performances were highlighted by a trio of champions on the PGA Tour that led to direct climbs in the OGR.

PACIFIC PALISADES, CALIFORNIA - FEBRUARY 18: Hideki Matsuyama
PACIFIC PALISADES, CALIFORNIA - FEBRUARY 18: Hideki Matsuyama of Japan reacts during the trophy presentation after putting in to win on the 18th green during the final round of The Genesis Invitational at Riviera Country Club on February 18, 2024 in Pacific Palisades, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
Harry How/Getty Images

Most recently, Japan’s Hideki Matsuyama, a participant at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, completed a come-from-behind victory at the Genesis Invitational. While Matsuyama was already the leading Japanese player in the Ranking, the win moved him into the top 15 and likely secured his spot as a top-two player from Japan to qualify for the Olympics. Matsuyama finished T3 at the Tokyo Olympics before falling in a playoff for the bronze medal.

In similar fashion, Canadian Nick Taylor won the WM Phoenix Open and Frenchman Matthieu Pavon won the Farmers Insurance Open to leap into the top half of the OGR and take a commanding lead to claim one of two spots to represent their respective countries. Taylor now ranks 16th, well ahead of fellow Canadians Adam Hadwin, Corey Conners, Adam Svensson and Mackenzie Hughes, all of whom are seemingly vying for the second spot representing Canada. Meanwhile Pavon became the first French golfer to win on the PGA Tour since World War II. 

BRADENTON, FLORIDA - JANUARY 25: Patty Tavatanakit of Thailand
BRADENTON, FLORIDA - JANUARY 25: Patty Tavatanakit of Thailand lines up a putt on the fourth green during the first round of the LPGA Drive On Championship at Bradenton Country Club on January 25, 2024 in Bradenton, Florida. (Photo by Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)
Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images

On the women’s side, Thailand’s Patty Tavatanakit broke through with her first international win since 2021 at the Aramco Saudi Ladies International, an event on the Ladies European Tour. While still outside the OGR as the third-ranked player from Thailand, she made significant gains on her countrywoman Chanettee Wannasaen for the second spot. Tavatanakit currently sits No. 43 in the Rolex Rankings after a leap of 27 positions following her win, six spots behind Wannasaen.

“It is at the back of my mind for sure,” said Tavatanakit this week at the Honda LPGA Thailand. “I really want to make Olympics just because like it's the Olympics. I want to represent my country and play…I know I'll give it my best. Even though if I don't get in, knowing at the back of my mind and heart that I gave it my best will not disappoint me.”

Elsewhere in the Ranking, Min Woo Lee has claimed the second Australian spot on the men’s side, while Hadwin has overtaken Conners for the second Canadian spot after a T4 finish at the Genesis Invitational. In the Women’s OGR, Singapore’s Shannon Tan – a 19-year-old – has entered the Ranking, as has Malaysia’s Ashley Lau. Korea’s Amy Yang (No. 15) has also overtaken Ji Yai Shin (No. 16) for a third position for the country.

Countries can only have more than two representatives if they have more than two within the top 15 of the OGR (with a limit of four). As currently constructed, the United States (four) and South Korea (three) would be the only countries with more than two representatives in the women’s competition. In the men’s competition, the United States (four) is the only country projected to include more than two representatives.

With the first of three weeks in a row in Asia on the LPGA Tour kicking off with this week’s Honda LPGA Thailand, and the PGA Tour set for the Mexico Open at Vidanta prior to the “Florida Swing,” plenty of opportunities are available for players to continue their climb into the OGR.   

Olympic Golf Ranking (OGR) can be found here.

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